CV

_________________________________________________________________
ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO

Associate Professor w/tenure, Department of Philosophy (July 2017-)

Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy (July 2012-July 2017)

Previous Academic Appointments

Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Alabama at Birmingham (August 2007-May 2012)

Secondary Academic Appointment, Department of Neurobiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham (November 2007-May 2012)
_________________________________________________________________
AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Philosophy of Neuroscience, Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Mind

AREAS OF COMPETENCE
History and Philosophy of Psychology, Epistemology, Philosophy of Psychiatry, Bioethics
_________________________________________________________________
EDUCATION

Ph.D. History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, 2007

Graduate Student Trainee Certificate, Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), University of Pittsburgh, 2007

M.S. Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh, 2003

M.A. History and Philosophy of Science, 2001

B.A. Philosophy (with high honors) Clark University, 1995

Certificat Practique de Langue Française, CIEF, Dijon, 1994
_________________________________________________________________
PUBLICATIONS

Peer Reviewed Journal Publications

(In Press) Optogenetics, Pluralism and Progress. Philosophy of Science.

(2017)  Cristina Dieni, Aldo Ferraresi, Silvarosa Grassi, Vito Enrico Pettorossi Jacqueline Sullivan and Roberto Panichi. Acute Inhibition of Estradiol Synthesis Impacts Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Adaptation and Cerebellar Long-Term Potentiation in Male Rats. Brain Structure and Function.

(2017) Coordinated Pluralism as a Means to Facilitate Integrative Taxonomies of Cognition. Philosophical Explorations Issue 2: 129-145.

(2016) Construct Stabilization and the Unity of the Mind-Brain Sciences. Philosophy of Science 83: 662-673.

(2016) Response to Commentary on Stabilizing constructs through collaboration across different research fields as a way to foster the integrative approach of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Project. Frontiers in Human Neurosciencehttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2016.00448/full

(2016) Stabilizing constructs through collaboration across different research fields as a way to foster the integrative approach of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Project. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2016.00309/full

(2015) “Qualitative Assessment of Self-Identity in Advanced Dementia”, Sadvhi Bahtra, Jacqueline Sullivan, Beverly Williams, David Geldmacher. Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice. doi: 10.1177/1471301215601619

(2010) “Reconsidering Spatial Memory and the Morris Water Maze”, Synthese 177(2): 261-283.

(2010) “Realization, Explanation and the Mind-Body Relation”, Editor’s Introduction. Synthese 177(2): 151-164.

(2010) “A Role for Representation in Cognitive Neurobiology”, Philosophy of Science 77(5): 875-887.

(2009) “The Multiplicity of Experimental Protocols: A Challenge to Reductionist and Non-Reductionist Models of the Unity of Neuroscience”, Synthese 167:511-539.

(2008) “Memory Consolidation, Multiple Realization and Modest Reductions”, Philosophy of Science 75(5): 501-513.

Peer-Reviewed Contributions to Anthologies

(2017) ‘Mechanisms in neuroscience’, with Catherine Stinson, for the Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Mechanisms, Stuart Glennan and Phyllis Illari (eds.)

(2017) “Long-term potentiation: One Kind or Many?” in Eppur si muove: Doing History and Philosophy of Science with Peter Machamer. Marcus Adams, Zvi Biener, Uljana Feest and Jackie Sullivan, eds., Springer.

(2016) “Models of Mental Illness” in The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Medicine, Harold Kincaid, Jeremy Simon and Miriam Solomon (eds.), New York: Routledge, 455-464.

(2016) “Neuroscientific Kinds Through the Lens of Scientific Practice” in Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice, Catherine Kendig (ed.), New York: Routledge, pp. 47-56.

(2015) “Experimentation in Cognitive Neuroscience and Cognitive Neurobiology” In The Handbook of Neuroethics (Springer), Jens Clausen and Neil Levy (Eds)., Dordrecht: Springer, pp. 31-47.

(2014) “Is the Next Frontier in Neuroscience a Decade of the Mind?” In Brain Theory, Charles Wolfe, Ed.(Palgrave-MacMillan), pp. 45-67.

(2014) “Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds” (w/Harold Kincaid). In Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds, Harold Kincaid and Jacqueline A. Sullivan, Eds. (MIT Press), pp. 1-10.

(2014) “Stabilizing Mental Disorders: Prospects and Problems” in Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds, Harold Kincaid and Jacqueline A. Sullivan, Eds. (MIT Press), pp. 257-281.

(2010) (w/Harold Kincaid) “Challenges to Medical Models of Addiction”, What is Addiction?, Harold Kincaid, Don Ross, David Spurrett and Peter Collins, (eds.), MIT Press. kincaidsullivan-05062015111110

Other published contributions

(2015) “Knowing Yourself — and Your Mental States — in New Ways” Western News Big Ideas Issue , May 7, 2015.

Papers Under Review

Martin, C., J. Sullivan, J. Wright, S. Köhler. Recognition-memory signals for objects from different categories are graded across perirhinal and parahippocampal cortex

In Prep

with Emily Baron (Toronto-Law) Using Mechanistic Neuroscience to Inform Legal Practice: Insights from the Philosophy of Scientific Experimentation (working title)

Cognition and Behavior: Coordinating Practices and Perspectives (Book manuscript, working title)

Unpublished Papers

(2001) “Leveling Reduction” w/Peter Machamer. (available on Phil-Sci Archive)
_________________________________________________________________
EDITED VOLUMES

Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds, Harold Kincaid and Jacqueline A. Sullivan, Eds. (2014, MIT Press)
9780262027052

Eppur si muove: Doing History and Philosophy of Science with Peter Machamer. Marcus Adams, Zvi Biener, Uljana Feest and Jackie Sullivan, Eds. (2017, Springer).

imagedump

 

_________________________________________________________________
GRANTS FUNDED/AWARDS

Dean’s Travel/Research Grant (2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017)

Faculty Research Development Fund Grant (Summer 2017) – Tracking Conceptual Change in the Sciences of the Mind and Brain and the Implications for Precision Medicine

Rotman Institute of Philosophy Research Award (2016-2017)
PROJECT TITLE: Neuroscientific Contributions to the Understanding of Epistemic Feelings
PROJECT PARTICIPANTS:  Stefan Köhler, Brain and Mind Institute (Co-Principal Investigator); Jackie Sullivan, Rotman Institute of Philosophy (Co-Principle Investigator); Jaclyn Lanthier, Rotman Institute of Philosophy (Graduate Research Assistant)

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Connection Grant Award
for Rethinking the Taxonomy of Psychology Workshop (2016)
PRIMARY INVESTIGATORS: Michael Anderson, Jacqueline Sullivan

Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Award
for Rethinking the Taxonomy of Psychology Workshop (2016)
PRIMARY INVESTIGATORS: Michael Anderson, Jacqueline Sullivan

Research Western Award
for Rethinking the Taxonomy of Psychology Workshop (2016)
PRIMARY INVESTIGATORS: Michael Anderson, Jacqueline Sullivan

Rotman Institute of Philosophy Award
for Rethinking the Taxonomy of Psychology Workshop (2016)
PRIMARY INVESTIGATORS: Michael Anderson, Jacqueline Sullivan

Faculty Research Development Fund – Conference Travel Grant (2015)

Rotman Institute Catalyst Fund Grant (2013-2014)
PROJECT TITLE: The Epistemic Status of fMRI Technology and Data Analysis Techniques
PROJECT PARTICIPANTS: Jacqueline Sullivan (Principal Investigator); Stefan Köhler (Co-Principal Investigator); Jessey Wright (graduate student); Chris Martin (graduate student)

Andrew Mellon Pre-doctoral Fellowship, University of Pittsburgh, September 2006—May 2007.

Provost’s Development Fund Fellowship, University of Pittsburgh, September 2004—May 2005.

National Science Foundation’s Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) Program Fellowship, January 2002–January 2004.

_________________________________________________________________
PRESENTATIONS AND PUBLISHED ABSTRACTS*

Invited Talks

“Extraordinary” Cognitive Science in an Era of Novel Tool Development and Big Data. Cognitive Science Program and Philosophy Department, Indiana University (Bloomington, IN, September 29, 2017)

Coordinated Pluralism as a Means to Facilitate Integrative Taxonomies of Cognition. Philosophy Department, McMaster University (Hamilton, ON,  March 17, 2017). [Invited by Sandra LaPointe]

Coordinated Pluralism as a Means to Facilitate Integrative Taxonomies of Cognition. Cognitive Science Program, Marquette University (Milwaukee, WI. March 9, 2017). [Invited by Corinne Bloch]

Cognitive Ontologies and Coordinated Pluralism. Operations and Cognitive Ontology Workshop. Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO. February 1, 2017). [Invited by Carl Craver]

Explaining Mental Illness: Will a Single Explanatory Model Do? London Library Lecture Series. Langdon Public Library (London, Ontario. October 12, 2016).

The Replication Crisis in Science. Philosophy of Science Cafe. Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario (London, Ontario September 30, 2016).

Experimentation and Mechanistic Explanation in the Mind-Brain Sciences. Causality in the Sciences of the Mind-Brain Conference, Aarhus University (Aarhus, Denmark, June 27-29, 2016).

The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Project: Can neuroscience revolutionize psychiatric classification? Neuroscience Graduate Diploma Program, York University (Toronto, ON, March 18, 2016).

The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Project: Can neuroscience revolutionize psychiatric classification? Clark University (Worcester, MA, September 24, 2015).

The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Project: Can neuroscience revolutionize psychiatric classification? Explanations of Cognition Workshop, University of Stirling (Stirling, UK, July 20-22, 2015). [Invited by Zoe Drayson]

The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Project: Can neuroscience revolutionize psychiatric classification? La Société de Philosophie Analytique, Invited Symposium on La philosophie de la psychiatrie (Montreal,QC June 2015). [Invited by Luc Faucher]

Construct Stabilization and the Unity of Neuroscience. Philosophy and the Cognitive Sciences Pre-SSPP Workshop at Loyola University (New Orleans, LA, April 2015).

Neuroscientific Kinds through the Lens of Scientific Practice. Southern Society for Psychology and Philosophy Annual Meeting, Invited Symposium on Natural Kinds (New Orleans, LA, April 2015).

Construct Stabilization and the Unity of the Mind-Brain Sciences. Department of Philosophy. University of Waterloo, (Waterloo, ON, February 2015). [Invited by Heather Douglas]

Construct Stabilization and Experimentation in Neuroscience. Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, (East Lansing, MI, March 14, 2014). [Invited by Dan Steel]

Is the Next Decade in Neuroscience a Decade of the Mind? Philosophy: Crossing Disciplines Undergraduate Conference, University of Western Ontario, (London, Ontario, March 2, 2014).

Construct Stabilization and Experimentation in Neuroscience. Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, University of Toronto, Colloquium Series. (Toronto, Ontario, January 29, 2014).

Construct Stabilization and Experimentation in Neuroscience. University of Calgary. (Calgary, Alberta, January 24, 2014). [Invited by Megan Delehanty]

Construct Stabilization and Experimentation. Experimentation in Neuroscience Workshop, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh.(Pittsburgh, PA, November 22-23, 2013). [Invited by Mazviita Chirimuuta]

Integrating Psychology and Neuroscience: The View from the Philosophy of Experiment. University of Western Ontario’s Eleventh Annual Graduate Conference in Philosophy of Mind, Language and Cognitive Science.(London, ON, May 23-25, 2013).

Café Scientifique (panelist), Neuroscience Meets Psychiatry: the Promise of New Treatments. Just Us Spring Garden Coffeehouse, (Halifax, NS, CANADA. [Funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Café Scientifique grant, Neuroscience Meets Psychiatry: the Promise of New Treatments (SCI 116810).], March 29, 2012). [Invited by Serife Tekin]

Promoting Mental Health: Challenges for Psychiatry and Neuroscience. Novel Tech Ethics, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, (Halfax, NS, CANADA. [Funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Café Scientifique grant, Neuroscience Meets Psychiatry: the Promise of New Treatments (SCI 116810)], March 28, 2012). [Invited by Serife Tekin]

Reviving the Mind in Cognitive Neurobiology: Towards Perspectival Pluralism in the Experimental Context. Department of Philosophy and Center for Neurodynamics, University of Missouri-St Louis, (St. Louis, MO, March 2, 2012).

Reviving the Mind in Cognitive Neurobiology: Towards Perspectival Pluralism in the Experimental Context. Department of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario (London, ON, CANADA, January 31, 2012).

Reviving the Mind in Cognitive Neurobiology. Department of Philosophy, York University (Toronto, ON, CANADA, January 13, 2012).

The Place of the Mind in Contemporary Neuroscience. Department of Philosophy, Mississippi State University, (Mississippi, MS, October 21, 2011). [Invited by John Bickle]

The Place of the Mind in Contemporary Neuroscience. Neurophilosophy Forum, Georgia State University, (Atlanta, GA, September 30, 2011).

Linking Models of Cognitive Neurobiological Experiments to Explanatory Models of Cognition—A Fundamental Role for Mental States. Delaware Cognition and Neuroscience Workshop. University of Delaware, (Delaware, Maryland, September 16 &17, 2011).

The Absence of Mind in the Neuroscientific Study of Cognition. 2011-2012 University Honors Program First Thursday Lecture Series, UAB, Birmingham, AL. (September 1, 2011).

Obstacles to Naturalizing the Mind: Insights from the Philosophy of Experiment, Current Topics in Philosophy of the Human Sciences. (Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany, June 18-19, 2010). [Invited by Uljana Feest]

Learning and Its Representation. Workshop: Turtles All the Way Down: Philosophical Approaches to Minds, Brains and Multiplicity. (McMicken College of Arts and Sciences and Department of Philosophy, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, October 2008).

The Unity of Neuroscience from a Contemporary Philosophical Perspective. Haddin Humanities Lecture, (UAB, Birmingham, AL, September 2008).

Mind as Matter: Challenges for the New Physicalism. Philosophy Speaker Series, (Clark University, Worcester, MA, September 2008).

Testing the Limits of Neuroepistemology. 44th Annual Philosophy Colloquium (University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, May 2008).

The Multiplicity of Experimental Protocols: A Challenge to Reductionist and Non-Reductionist Models of the Unity of Neuroscience. Neuroscience and the Mind-Brain Relationship Workshop, (Centenary College, Shreveport, LA, October 2007).

Extending Mechanistic Claims Beyond the Neurobiological Laboratory. Workshop on Neural Mechanisms, Explanation and Reduction in the Neurosciences. (Center for the Study of Mind in Nature, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, September 2007).

Reliability and Validity of Experiment in the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. (Philosophy Department, University of Alabama at Birmingham, January 2007).

Reliability and Validity of Experiment in the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. (Philosophy Department, San Francisco State University, January 2007).

Public Outreach Presentations

Canadian Association for Girls In Science (CAGIS) Outreach Activity. (w/Melissa Jacquart, Phoebe Friesen & Shari Monner). University of Western Ontario (London, ON Canada, March 21, 2013).

Two Different Perspectives on Mind. Philosophy and Neuroscience Speakers Series. London Library (London, ON Canada, October 17, 2012).

Your Mind and Other Minds: A Discussion. Donaldson Correctional Facility, (Bessemer, AL, May 8, 2012).

Conference Presentations and Published Abstracts*

Commentary on Thomas Polger and Lawrence Shapiro’s The Multiple Realization Book. Author Meets Critics Session, Pacific APA (Seattle, WA, April 2017).

Optogenetics, Pluralism and Progress. Philosophy of Science Association Bi-Annual Meeting (Atlanta, GA, November 2016).

Construct Stabilization and the Unity of Neuroscience. Philosophy of Science Association Bi-Annual Meeting (Chicago, IL, November 2014).

Batra S, Sullivan JA, Geldmacher DS. Qualitative assessment of self-identity in advanced dementia. Poster presented at the 13th Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (Boston, MA. July 2013).

Batra S, Sullivan JA, Geldmacher DS. Qualitative assessment of self-identity in advanced dementia. Poster presented at Dementia Care @AAIC: Translating Research to Practice (Boston, MA. July 2013).

Is Construct Validity Necessary for Mechanistic Explanations of Cognitive Functions? Symposium on Taxonomic Practices in the Scientific Study of Cognition: Do Valid Constructs Matter? Fourth Biennial Meeting of the Society for the Study of Science in Practice, (Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (IHPST), Victoria College, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, June 2013).*

The Place of the Mind in Contemporary Neuroscience. (w/Floh Thiels), 2011 Annual Society for Neuroscience Meeting, (Washington DC, November 2011).*

Experimental Paradigms, Cognitive Functions and Realization. Realization, Multiplicity and Experimentation in Biology, Psychology & Neuroscience Workshop, (University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, February 2010).

Medical Models of Psychopathology. Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable (Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands, October 2009).

The Implications of Experimental Practice for Cognitive Models of Schizophrenia. Workshop on Natural Kinds and Classification in Psychopathology (University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, April 2009).

Challenges for Medical Models of Addiction. (w/Harold Kincaid). 17th European Congress of Psychiatry. (Lisbon, Portugal, January 24-28, 2009).

Learning and Its Representation. Philosophy of Science Association Biennial Meeting. (Pittsburgh, PA, November 2008).

Reliability, Validity and The Experimental Process: A Neurobiological Case Study. First Biennial Meeting of the Society for the Philosophy of Science in Practice. (University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands, August 2007).

Memory Consolidation, Multiple Realizations and Modest Reductions. Philosophy of Science Association Bi-Annual Meeting, (Vancouver, BC, November 2006).

Reward, Reinforcement and the Dopamine System: Making Conceptual Transitions Across Multiple Levels of Organization. Neurophilosophy: The State of the Art, (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, June 2005).

The Study of Learning and Memory Then and Now: Conceptual Problems and Experimental Limitations. Sullivan, J.A., Machamer, P.K., Thiels, E. Learning and Memory Workshop, (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, April 2005).*

The Study of Learning and Memory Then and Now: Evidence for Conceptual Change? Sullivan, J.A., Machamer, P.K., Thiels, E., Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, (San Diego, CA, November 2004).*

Differential Recruitment of ERK in two forms of LTP in the adult hippocampus in vivo. Sullivan, J.A., DeLoreia C.E., Kanterewicz, B.I., Thiels, E. Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, (New Orleans, LA, November 2003).*

Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase: A General Plasticity Kinase. National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training Program (NSF-IGERT) Symposium, (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, June 2003).

Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase: One Cascade, Two Forms of Synaptic Plasticity. Sullivan, J.A., Kanterewicz, B.I., Thiels, E. Learning and Memory Workshop, (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, April 2003).*

The Role Of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase in LTP vs. LTD in the Adult Hippocampus In Vivo. Sullivan, J.A., Kanterewicz, B.I., Thiels, E., Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, (Orlando, FL, November 2002).*

Levels of Analysis, Reduction and Neuroscience. (Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), Mellon Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, January 2002).

Leveling Reduction with Peter Machamer. Pittsburgh-London Workshop in Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience, (Birbeck College, London, England, September 2001).

Invited Commentaries

Invited commentary on Sarah Robbin’s “Optogenetics and the Mechanism of False Memory”, Southern Society for Psychology and Philosophy Annual Meeting,(New Orleans, LA, April 2015)commentsonSara4

Invited commentary on Kathryn Tabb’s “Philosophy of Psychiatry after Diagnostic Kinds”, Early Career Scholars Conference in Philosophy of Psychiatry: Overcoming Mind-Brain Dualism in 21st Century Medicine, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA, November 21-22). (remotely)commentsonKatie3

Invited commentary on Robert Foley’s “Flexible Intentional Action as a Criterion for Consciousness”, Canadian Philosophical Association Annual Meeting, Brock University (St. Catherine’s, ON, May 2014).

Invited commentary on Serife Tekin’s “Self-insight in the Time of Mood Disorders”, Southern Society for Philosophy of Psychology (SSPP) Annual Meeting, (New Orleans, LA, March 2011).sspcommentsforserife1-2

Invited commentary, “An Ode to Peter Machamer”. Peterfest at The Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA, October 2009).

Invited commentary on Melody Dye, Michael Ramscar and Nal Kalchbrenner’s article “No representation without taxation: The costs and benefits of learning to conceptualize the environment”, Society for Philosophy and Psychology (SPP) Annual Meeting, (Bloomington, IN, June 2009).CommentaryonDye&colleagues

Invited commentary on Kenneth Aizawa’s The Biochemistry of Memory Consolidation and Multiple Realization. Society for Philosophy and Psychology (SPP) Annual Meeting, (Wake Forest University, Wake Forest, NC, June 2005).commentary

Invited commentary on Steven Quartz’s Toward a Developmental Evolutionary Psychology: Genes, Development and the Evolution of Human Cognitive Architecture. Proceedings of the Pittsburgh Workshop in Hist. and Phil. of Biology, (Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, March 2002). commentary on Quartz

Guest Lectures for Undergraduate Classes 

Construct Stabilization and the Unity of Neuroscience. (published in Philosophy of Science) Washington University in St. Louis, February 2, 2017 (Live),  [Carl Craver’s UG Memory course]

Multiplicity of Experimental Protocols: A Challenge to Reductionist and Non-Reductionist Accounts of the Unity of Neuroscience. (published in Synthese) Washington University in St. Louis, February 2, 2015 (via Skype). [Carl Craver’s UG Memory course]

_________________________________________________________________
Student Supervision

PhD Students

Previous

  1. Jessey Wright, “Evidence in Neuroscience: Towards a Philosophy of Data Analysis” (PhD awarded July 2017; Placement: National Science Foundation and Social Science and Humanities Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University (working with Russell Poldrack (Psychology and Neuroscience) and Helen Longino (Philosophy)) Website: http://jesseywright.com/site/

Current

  1. Jaclyn Lanthier, “Understanding Epistemic Feelings Via Interdisciplinary Corroboration” (in progress)
  2. Frederic-Ismael Banville, “Accounting for the Dynamics of Scientific Inquiry” (in progress)
  3. Nicholas Slothouber, “Individuating Mental Disorders” (in progress)

MA Students

  1. Helen Meskhidze, “Simulationist’s Regress in Laboratory Astrophysics” (Awarded August 2017; Currently a PhD student in Logic and Philosophy of Science at UC Irvine)
  2. Robert Munro, “Significance Testing for a Post-Crisis World” (Awarded, summer 2017; Currently a student in J.D. Program at University of British Columbia)
  3. Jaclyn Lanthier, “Epistemic Progress in Cognitive Neuroscience and [Cognitive] Neurobiology: How, If at All, Can Functional Triangulation and Integration Contribute to this Process?” (Awarded August 2014; Currently a PhD student at UWO)
  4. Phoebe Friesen, “For Accuracy and For Honesty: Embracing the Epistemic Side of Scientific Explanation” (Awarded August 2013; Currently a PhD student in Philosophy at CUNY)
  5. Peter Verveniotis, “Intentionality, Function and Neural Mechanisms” (Awarded August 2013; Currently a PhD student in Philosophy at UWO)

BA Students

  1. Sadhvi Bahtra (co-advisor w/David Geldmacher), “Qualitative Assessment of Self-Identity in Advanced Dementia”(Awarded 05/2014; Currently an MD student at University of Alabama Medical School)

_________________________________________________________________
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE

Thesis Committees

(External Examiner)

PHD

(1) Craig Roxborough (Philosophy, York University) “Putting the Folk Back in Folk Psychology: The Social, Cultural, and Moral Character of Folk Psychology” [2016]

(External Department/Within-University Examiner, UWO)

PHD

(1) Devin Duke (Psychology) “The Neural and Cognitive Basis of Cumulative Lifetime Familiarity Assessment”[2016]

(2) Chris Martin (Psychology) “Category-Specific Item Recognition and the Medial Temporal Lobe” [2015]

(3) Jennifer Milne (Psychology) “Seeing with Sound: Investigating the Behavioral Applications and Neural Correlates of Human Echolocation” [2014]

(4) Ed O’Neil (Psychology) “Representation of Faces in Perirhinal Cortex” [2013]

MS

(1) Margarita Maltseva (Psychology) “Congruent Familiar Size Relationships Decrease Size Contrast” [2015]

(2) Jordan Zunder (Neuroscience) “Dissociating the Psychoactive Effects of Distinct Cannabis Compounds in the Mesocorticolimbic Circuitry” [2014]

(3) Jeffrey Wong (Psychology) “Revisiting Working Memory: Are Domain, Process, and Global Models Mutually Exclusive, Nested or Orthogonal?: A revised model of neural mechanisms underlying working memory” [2014]

(4) Samantha Podebarac (Psychology) Are Visual Texture-selective Areas Recruited During Haptic Texture Discrimination? [2013]

 

Service in Department of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario

  • Annual Performance Evaluation Committee, July 2015-July 2017
  • Appointments Committee, July 2012-July 2015, July 2016-July 2017
  • Undergraduate Honors Mentoring Coordinator, July 2016-July 2017
  • Advisor to Undergraduate Philosophy Club, The School of Thought, July 2012-July 2017
  • Graduate Program Committee for Mind and Language, July 2012-present
  • Graduate Program Committee for Philosophy of Science, July 2012-present
  • Originator and Coordinator of Writing Workshop for BMI-Rotman Lab Associates Group, May 2015-September 2015
  • Committee for Women’s Concerns, July 2014-December 2014
  • Graduate Admissions Committee, Member, July 2012-June 2013
  • Outreach Committee, Member, July 2012-June 2013, July 2015-June 2016

 

Service in Rotman Institute of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario

  • Co-founder and co-coordinator of BMI-Rotman Lab Associates Program, September 2012-June 2013
  • Philosophy and Neuroscience Committee, July 2012-June 2015
  • Rotman Steering Committee, Member, July 2012-June 2015

Service in Department of Philosophy, University of Alabama at Birmingham

  • Organizer and coordinator of “Realization, Multiplicity and Experimentation in Biology, Psychology & Neuroscience” Workshop (February 2010)
  • Faculty Advisor, UAB Philosophy Club (2009-2012)
  • Library Acquisitions Representative (2008-2012)

Service in College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), University of Alabama at Birmingham

  • Undergraduate Neuroscience Mentor (2010-2012)
  • Faculty Affairs Committee (2009-2010)
  • Guest Lecturer for Science and Technology Studies Honors Program (Fall 2007; Fall 2009)
  • Advisor for Science and Technology Studies Honors Program (Fall 2007, Fall 2009, Spring 2011-Spring 2012)
  • Tenure and Promotion Committee (2007-2008)

Service to Profession

       Refereeing for Journals

  • Brain and Cognition (2017)
  • International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research (2013)
  • Minds and Machines (2017)
  • Philosophical Psychology (2012, 2013)
  • Philosophy of Science (2010, 2012)
  • THEORIA (2010)
  • Synthese (2006, 2012, 2017)

 

      Grant Reviewing

  • National Science Foundation, panelist (2011)
  • Referee for Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada (2011)

 

      Conference Chairing

  • Science and Reality Conference, University of Western Ontario (London, ON, October 2013)
  • Session on Issues in Cognitive Science, Society for the Philosophy of Science in Practice (Toronto, ON, June 2013)
  • Session on Theory of Mind, Southern Society for Philosophy of Psychology (Savannah, GA, March 2012)
  • Session on Mood, Southern Society for Philosophy of Psychology (New Orleans, LA, March 2011)
  • Session on Philosophical Issues in Experimental Science, Southern Society for Philosophy of Psychology (New Orleans, LA, March 2011)

 

       Editorial Work 

  • Member of Editorial Board for History, Philosophy and Theory in the Life Sciences (Book Series – Springer) (2010-present)

    Service in Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh

  • Teaching Assistant-Teaching Fellow Mentor (2006-2007)
  • Referee, Annual Pitt-CMU Graduate Conference in Philosophy (1999)
  • Saturday Workshop Coordinator, Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC)(2002-2004)

_________________________________________________________________
TEACHING EXPERIENCE

University of Western Ontario

Graduate Courses

Philosophy of Neuroscience. The aim of this course is to examine recent work in philosophy of neuroscience. Topics to be considered include: the nature and structure of neuroscientific explanation, the epistemology of neuroscientific experiment, the relationship between experimentation and explanation and the feasibility of integrating psychology and neuroscience. (Winter term 2013, 2014, 2016)

Philosophy of Scientific Experimentation. Science advances our understanding of the world and ourselves primarily by means of experimentation. Yet, what is an experiment? How do experiments differ across different areas of science? How do experiments produce knowledge? Are experiments always knowledge-generating? What differentiates a successful experiment from an unsuccessful experiment? Answering these questions by exploring historical, philosophical and theoretical analyses of experimentation in the physical, biological and mind-brain sciences will be the primary aims of this course. (Winter term 2015, 2017)

Undergraduate Courses

Critical Thinking. This course provides an introduction to basic principles of critical thinking and is designed to enhance the student’s ability to detect and analyze various forms of reasoning encountered in everyday life, academic and professional contexts. Topics to be covered include: argument identification and evaluation, fallacy detection, formal symbolization of arguments, deductive and inductive reasoning, the influence of social and psychological factors on our judgments, the structure of scientific reasoning, how to interpret statistics, theories of moral reasoning and how to assess claims put forward by the media and popular press. statistics, theories of moral reasoning and how to assess claims put forward by the media and popular press. (Fall term 2012, Winter term 2013)

PHIL2050F: The Scientific Search for the Mind. An evaluation of sciences attempting to understand the nature of the mind and its place in the physical world. Topics may include: phrenology & localization theory, physiology, neuroanatomy, gestalt psychology, experimental psychology, evolutionary psychology, psychophysics, psychoanalysis, behaviorism, cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, intelligence testing and the nature of consciousness. (Fall term 2013, 2015, 2016)

PHIL3450: Philosophy of Neuroscience. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the philosophy of neuroscience. Questions to be considered include: What constitutes an adequate explanation of a phenomenon (e.g., motor learning, vision, memory) in neuroscience? What assumptions inform neuroscientific research (e.g., is the mind nothing over and above the brain? Are mental processes simply brain processes)? Are the methods and techniques that neuroscientists use adequate for generating knowledge claims about the brain, central nervous system, cognition and behavior? In instances in which they are inadequate, can such methods and techniques be improved? How? What kinds of claims about the mind-brain relationship, free will and morality may be made on the basis of neuroscientific data? What is the relationship between cognitive neuroscience and cognitive neurobiology or “top-down” and “bottom-up” approaches to the study of cognition and behavior? In this course we will address and aim to answer each of these questions, which should be of interest to students majoring in philosophy, psychology or neuroscience. (Fall term 2012, Winter term 2014, Fall term 2015, Winter term 2017)

PHIL3501F: Epistemology. An advanced introduction to the theory of knowledge. A number of representative positions ranging from standard analytic epistemology to naturalized epistemology on the issues of knowledge and epistemic justification will be compared and contrasted. (Fall term 2013, Winter term 2016, Fall term 2016)

Guest Lecturer on Ethics of Animal Experimentation for Arthur Brown’s Advanced Topics in Integrative Neuroscience Course (Winter term 2015, 2016)

Guest lecturer on History of Biological Psychiatry in Steve Laviolette and Walter Rushlow’s Biological Psychiatry Course (Winter term 2014, 2015)

 

 

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Philosophy of Neuroscience. Instructor. This undergraduate honors course will begin by introducing students to a set of conceptual tools intended to inform, during the rest of the term, the investigation of the relationship between certain philosophical claims and those neuroscientific data/case studies on which they are based. Emphasis will be placed on critically evaluating the structure and foundations of experiments in the neurosciences of cognition. (Spring 2012)

Epistemology. Instructor. An upper-level undergraduate course in which a number of representative positions from standard and naturalized epistemology on the issues of knowledge and epistemic justification are investigated and contrasted. (Spring 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011)

Bioethics. Instructor. An introduction to biomedical ethics. (Spring 2008, Summer 2008, Fall 2008, Summer 2009, Fall 2009, Summer 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011)

Philosophy of Mind. Instructor. An upper-level undergraduate survey course in which various positions occupied on the nature of the mind-brain relationship, mental causation and the nature of consciousness are evaluated and contrasted (Fall 2007, 2008, Spring 2011)

Philosophy of Psychopathology. Co-taught with Harold Kincaid. An upper-level undergraduate course in which various philosophical and scientific approaches to understanding the nature and causes of mental disorders and approaches to diagnosis and treatment of such disorders are compared and contrasted. (Spring 2010)

University of Pittsburgh

Magic, Medicine and Science. Instructor. An upper level undergraduate course in which the scientific ideas of the Ancients are compared to those of the 17th century mechanical philosophers. (Summer 2006)

Morality and Medicine. Instructor. An introduction to biomedical ethics. (Spring 2006, Fall 2005, Spring 2004*, Summers 2001, 2000, 1999) (*Received teaching commendation from the College of General Studies and Dept. of History and Philosophy of Science)

Myth and Science. Instructor. An introductory level history and philosophy of science course that explores the differences between myth and science in antiquity. (Summer 2005) (*Received teaching commendation from Dept. of History and Philosophy of Science)

Darwinism and Its Critics. Instructor. An upper-level undergraduate course that examines the impact of Darwin’s predecessors and contemporaries on the development of the theory of evolution by natural selection. (Summer 2004)

Science and Pseudoscience. Instructor. A freshman-level introduction to foundational issues in philosophy of science. (Fall 2000)

Mind and Medicine. Instructor. An upper-level introduction to the history and philosophy of mind, psychology, & neuroscience.(Spring 2000, Fall 1999)

ASSISTANTSHIPS

Introduction to Neuroscience. Teaching Assistant. A freshman-level introduction to neuroscience. (Fall 2001)

Explanations of Humans and Society. Teaching Assistant. A freshman-level introduction to the ideas of Freud, Skinner and Piaget. (Spring 2001)

Morality and Medicine. Teaching Assistant. An introduction to biomedical ethics.(Spring 1999)

Mind and Medicine. Teaching Assistant. An introduction to the history and philosophy of mind, psychology and neuroscience. (Fall 1998)

Clark University

Personal Values. Teaching Assistant. An introductory philosophy course with a focus on ethics. (Fall 1994)

_________________________________________________________________
GRADUATE COURSEWORK COMPLETED (PITT)

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND, PSYCHOLOGY & NEUROSCIENCE
Epistemology and Cognition (P. Machamer)
Consciousness, Emotions and Neuroscience (P. Machamer)
Decision Theory (T. Horowitz)
Philosophy of Psychology (C. Glymour)
Philosophy and Neuroscience (P. Machamer)(A)
Perception (P. Machamer and E. Machery) (A)

PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Philosophy of Science (W. Salmon)
Recent Topics in Philosophy of Science (P. Griffiths)
Philosophy of the Social Sciences (M. Salmon)
Topics in the Philosophy of Biology (S. Mitchell)
Aristotle’s Philosophy of Science (J. Lennox)
Science and Values (P.Machamer)
Science and Its Rhetoric (J. McGuire and J. Lyne)

PHILOSOPHY
Metaphysics and Epistemology (J. Camp)(A)
Symbolic Logic (N. Belnap)

HISTORY OF SCIENCE
History of Science I (Ancient to Modern)(J. Lennox)
History of Science II (P. Machamer)
Darwin’s Origin (J. Lennox)
History of Medicine (R. Olby)

COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
Cognitive Neuroscience (C. Olson and J. McClelland – CNBC – Carnegie Mellon University)
Introduction to Parallel Distributive Processing (D. Plaut -Carnegie Mellon University)
Current Research in Neural Basis of Cognition (C. Colby)

NEUROBIOLOGY
Biological Basis of Learning and Memory (G. Barrionuevo)
Topics in Neuroscience (G. Barrionuevo)
Synaptic Transmission (S. Meriney)
Introduction to Neuroscience (E. Stricker)
Neurophysiology (J. Johnson)
Systems Neurobiology (B. Yates (team taught))
Seminar in the Synapse (E. Thiels)

TEACHING SEMINARS
HPS Departmental Teaching Practicum (J.E. McGuire)
Faculty Development (C. Washburn)
_________________________________________________________________
PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

American Philosophical Association (APA), Molecular and Cellular Cognition Society (MCCS),
Philosophy of Science Association (PSA), Society for Neuroscience (SFN),
Society for Philosophy and Psychology (SPP), Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology (SSPP)
_________________________________________________________________

Advertisements